abscess

Foot Progression Collage

I finally completed a project I’ve been wanting to do for some time: a complete collage of the progression of Tristan’s right front.

For those who haven’t heard this before, let me make a long story short: in August 2012, Tristan blew a massive abscess out his coronet band. Over the next few weeks, he blew it again halfway down the foot and at the toe. Eventually, we discovered that it was due to an infected stress fracture of the coffin bone, and in March 2013 had surgery to remove bone chips and dead bone.

(if you want the story in excruciating detail, check out the abscess and surgery tags)

Photos are as follows. The top left photo is from August 2012, the night I discovered the abscess. They follow through monthly, left to right, at roughly the same time each month. August and September 2013 were lost in a camera data card crash, and I don’t have a November 2013. The bottom right photo was taken on December 18, 2013 and still roughly represents where his foot is today.

For anyone who has ever wondered what a massive abscess hole looks like as it grows down from the coronet band to the toe, look no further.

This will, please God, be the last entry in the abscess tag set.

8 thoughts on “Foot Progression Collage

  1. That is amazing, both good and bad. It makes you go Yikes! but seeing the progression towards a healthy hoof is cool. Hopefully this will all be a distant memory soon!

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  2. I think I got used to it over the year+ that it took to grow out. Every time I showed it to someone else, though, they freaked out. If anything, it was even worse in person!

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  3. It started as a way to talk to vets and farriers about the foot, and then it became a quest so really get it all documented. I tend to be a little, hm, obsessive about his medical records to begin with, so it seemed natural!

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  4. Yes, I'm sure – especially since three different vets missed it before my vet up here caught it (or rather, knew something was off and advised me to send the x-rays to a specialty radiologist).

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